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Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and is characterised by disruptions in the functioning of the brain. The disease strikes across all social statuses, cultures and genders.

In people over the age of 60, the incidence is higher than that of stroke, musculoskeletal disorders, cardiovascular complications and cancer.

There is no single cause for AD. The idea that AD is a metabolic disorder is now also slowly beginning to filter into the minds of researchers and even reaching mainstream medicine.

Seeing that the brain consumes a massive 25% of the total energy produced in the body, energy supply to the brain is crucial. Most of the energy is derived either from glucose or ketones. Recent evidence therefore points to insulin resistance in the brain as a contributing factor towards the development of AD, as glucose can then no longer be used easily to fuel brain cells.

Genetic and environmental factors may also play a role in the development of AD. What also seems to be happening is disturbances in cell membranes, allowing calcium to leak into the cells and causing the cells to implode (collapse).

Other factors may also add to the problem of AD and direct the disturbance towards the brain. There is the serious damage from metals especially aluminium toxicity. Even trace amounts are a serious toxin and this includes lead and mercury.

Alzheimer’s disease treatment becomes a question of common sense. Firstly the insulin resistance must be dealt with by changing diet and reducing the intake of refined carbohydrates as a starting point.

It is then also essential to keep the energy production centres of the cells (mitochondria) healthy. This can be done through adding co-enzyme Q10, carnitine/L-acetyl carnitine to your supplement regime.

Free radicals are produced by the mitochondria especially when dysfunctional and these should be neutralized with nutrients such as alpha lipoic acid and even ketoacids have been shown to reverse mitochondrial dysfunction.

Additional substances that can be added to the diet to help fight the battle against AD may include: Coconut oil, Vitamin D, Omega 3 Fish oil or Krill oil, Anti-oxidants and B vitamins.

Exercise is also essential in the battle against AD, and effort should be made to keep mental stimulation on track with things like crossword puzzles, learning to play a musical instrument and travelling.

Irrespective of the above information, it is still important to note that each practitioner must decide the management of each particular patient according to what is regarded as the main underlying problem.

There is no single cause for Alzheimer’s disease, nor is there a single Alzheimer’s disease treatment. The idea that AD is a metabolic disorder is now also slowly beginning to filter into the minds of researchers and even reaching mainstream medicine.

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and is characterised by disruptions in the functioning of the brain. In people over the age of 60, the incidence is higher than that of stroke, musculoskeletal disorders, cardiovascular complications and cancer. The disease strikes across all social statuses, cultures and genders.

Seeing that the brain consumes a massive 25% of the total energy produced in the body, energy supply to the brain is crucial. Most of the energy is derived either from glucose or ketones. Recent evidence therefore points to insulin resistance in the brain as a contributing factor towards the development of AD, as glucose can then no longer be used easily to fuel brain cells.

Genetic and environmental factors may also play a role in the development of AD. What also seems to be happening is disturbances in cell membranes, allowing calcium to leak into the cells and causing the cells to implode (collapse).

Other factors may also add to the problem of AD and direct the disturbance towards the brain. There is the serious damage from metals especially aluminium toxicity. Even trace amounts are a serious toxin and this includes lead and mercury.

Alzheimer’s disease treatment becomes a question of common sense. Firstly the insulin resistance must be dealt with by changing diet and reducing the intake of refined carbohydrates as a starting point.

In Alzheimer’s disease treatment, it is then also essential to keep the energy production centres of the cells (mitochondria) healthy. This can be done through adding co-enzyme Q10, carnitine/L-acetyl carnitine to your supplement regime.

Free radicals are produced by the mitochondria especially when dysfunctional and these should be neutralized with nutrients such as alpha lipoic acid and even ketoacids have been shown to reverse mitochondrial dysfunction.

Additional substances that can be added to the diet to help fight the battle against AD may include: Coconut oil, Vitamin D, Omega 3 Fish oil or Krill oil, Anti-oxidants and B vitamins.

Exercise is also essential in the battle against AD, and effort should be made to keep mental stimulation on track with things like crossword puzzles, learning to play a musical instrument and travelling.

Irrespective of the above information, it is still important to note that each practitioner must decide the management of each particular patient according to what is regarded as the main underlying problem.

This article is based on the article written by Dr Bernard Brom in the “Creating Health Newsletter”, Issue 10, October 2016.